OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Colloquium Series

Once every week while school is in session, EECS invites a distinguished researcher or practitioner in a computer science or electrical and computer engineering-related field to present their ideas and/or work. Talks are generally targeted to electrical engineering and computer science graduate students. This colloquium series is free and open to everyone.

Upcoming Colloquia

EECS Distinguished Lecture: A System of Systems Framework for Autonomy, Big Data Analytic, and Cloud Infrastructure

Monday, May 2, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
COVL 216

Speaker Information

Mo Jamshidi
Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Texas, San Antonio

Abstract

Large data has been accumulating in all aspects of our lives for quite some time. Advances in sensor technology, the Internet, wireless communication, and inexpensive memory have all contributed to an explosion of “Big Data”. System of Systems (SoS) are integration of independent operable and non-homogeneous legacy systems to achieve a higher goal than the sum of the parts. Today’s SoS are also contributing to the existence of unmanageable “Big Data”. Recent efforts have developed promising approach, called “Data Analytics”, which uses machine learning tools from statistical and soft computing (SC) such as principal component analysis (PCA), clustering, fuzzy logic, neuro-computing, evolutionary computation, Bayesian networks, deep architectures and deep learning, etc. to reduce the size of “Big Data” to a manageable size and apply these tools to a) extract information, b) build a knowledge base using the derived data, and c) eventually develop a non-parametric model for the “Big Data”. This keynote attempts to construct a bridge between SoS and Data Analytics to develop reliable models for such systems. A photovoltaic energy forecasting problem of a micro grid SoS, traffic jams forecasting and a system of autonomous vehicles will be offered for case studies. These tools will be used to extract a nonlinear MODEL for a SoS-generated BIG DATA. Videos for autonomous vehicles will be shown.

Speaker Bio

Mo M. Jamshidi (Fellow IEEE, Fellow ASME, A. Fellow-AIAA, Fellow AAAS, A. Fellow TWAS, Fellow NYAS) received BS in EE, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA in June 1967, the MS and Ph.D. degrees in EE from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA in June 1969 and February 1971, respectively. He holds honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Waterloo, Canada, 2004 and Technical University of Crete, Greece, 2004. Currently, he is the Lutcher Brown Endowed Distinguished Chaired Professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, USA. He has been an advisor to NASA (including 1st MARS Mission), USAF, USDOE and EC/EU (Brussels). He has over 740 technical publications including 68 books (12 text books), research volumes, and edited volumes in English and a few foreign languages. He is the Founding Editor or co-founding editor or Editor-in-Chief of 5 journals including IEEE Control Systems Magazine and the IEEE Systems Journal. He is an Honorary Professor at three Chinese Universities (Nanjing and Xi’an), Deakin University (Australia), Birmingham University and Loughbrough University (UK), and Obuda University (Hungary). In October 2005 he was awarded the IEEE’s Norbert Weiner Research Achievement Award. He is a member of the University of the Texas System Chancellor’s Council since 2011. In his two research laboratories with 25 graduate students, he is currently involved in research on system of systems engineering with emphasis on cloud computing, robotics, UAVs, bioinformatics and sustainable energy systems. He has over 6800 citations on Google Scholar.

New Ingredients in the Pot - Rethink Analog IC Design

Monday, May 9, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
COVL 216

Speaker Information

Nan Sun
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
UT Austin

Abstract

In this talk, I will present several unconventional analog IC design techniques. First, I will talk about how we can make use of noise, which is usually deemed as an undesirable thing, to estimate the conversion residue and increase the SNR of a SAR ADC. It is an interesting example of stochastic resonance, in which the increase in noise can lead to not SNR degradation but SNR enhancement. Second, I will talk about how we can break the Nyquist sampling theorem by exploiting the sparsity of the input signal. I will show an example of a multi-channel compressive sensing ADC and how the effective ADC conversion rate can be reduced by 4 times but without losing information. Third, I will discuss the challenges of the classic opamp-based analog signal processing (ASP) framework in advanced nanometer CMOS processes. I will then present novel phase-domain ASP techniques and show how to use them to build scaling-friendly and power efficient mixed-signal circuits

Speaker Bio

Nan Sun is Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He received the B.S. degree from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China in 2006, where he ranked top in Department of Electronic Engineering and graduated with the highest honor and the Outstanding Undergraduate Thesis Award. He received the Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in 2010. Dr. Sun holds the AMD Development Chair at UT Austin. He received the NSF Career Award in 2013 and Jack Kilby Research Award from UT Austin in 2015. He also received Samsung Fellowship, Hewlett Packard Fellowship, and Analog Devices Outstanding Student Designer Award in 2003, 2006, and 2007, respectively. He won Harvard Teaching Award in three consecutive years: 2008, 2009, and 2010. He serves in the TPC of IEEE Asian Solid-State Circuit Conference. He is Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems – I: Regular Papers.

Past Colloquia

Xiao (Simon) Li
Wednesday, March 30, 2016 -
9:00am to 10:00am
Sam Felton
Tuesday, March 29, 2016 -
11:00am to 12:00pm
Jeffrey Walling
Monday, March 28, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
Tarik Taleb
Monday, March 28, 2016 -
10:00am to 11:00am
Xusheng Xiao
Monday, March 28, 2016 -
9:00am to 10:00am
Marek Petrik
Tuesday, March 15, 2016 -
9:00am to 10:00am
Jeff Phillips
Friday, March 11, 2016 -
9:00am to 9:50am
Greg P. Carman
Monday, February 29, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm

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