OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Colloquium Series

Once every week while school is in session, EECS invites a distinguished researcher or practitioner in a computer science or electrical and computer engineering-related field to present their ideas and/or work. Talks are generally targeted to electrical engineering and computer science graduate students. This colloquium series is free and open to everyone.

Upcoming Colloquia

Probabilistic (Logic) Programming: Concepts and Applications

Monday, February 8, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
KEC 1003

Speaker Information

Luc De Raedt
Professor
Department of Computer Science
University of Leuven

Abstract

Recently, there has been a lot of attention for statistical relational learning and probabilistic programming, which provide rich representations for coping with uncertainty, with structure and for learning. In this talk I shall focus on probabilistic *logic* programming languages, which naturally belong to both of these paradigms as they combine the power of a programming language with a possible world semantics. They are typically based on Sato’s distribution semantics and they have been studied for over twenty years now. In this talk, I shall introduce the concepts underlying probabilistic logic programming, their semantics, different inference and learning mechanisms and I shall then present some recent extensions towards dealing with continuous distributions and dynamics. I shall also sketch some emerging applications in bioinformatics, where it is used to analyse molecular profiling data in networks, and in robotics, where it is used for tracking relational worlds in which objects or their properties are occluded in real time, and to planning. Finally, I shall discuss some open challenges and opportunities for research.

Speaker Bio

Luc De Raedt is a full professor (of research) at the University of Leuven (KU Leuven) in the Department of Computer Science and a former chair of Machine Learning at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg. Luc De Raedt has been working in the areas of artificial intelligence and computer science, especially on computational logic, machine learning and data mining, probabilistic reasoning and constraint programming and their applications in bio- and chemo-informatics, vision and robotics, natural language processing, and engineering. His work has typically crossed boundaries between different research areas, often working towards an integration of their principles. He is well-known for his work on inductive logic programming (combining logic with learning). Since 2000, he has been working towards a further integration of logical and relational learning with probabilistic reasoning (statistical relational learning and probabilistic programming), on inductive querying in databases, and on using declarative languages for data mining and machine learning. He was program (co)-chair of ECAI 2012, ICML 2005 and ECML/PKDD 2001 and he is an ECCAI fellow.

Action, Gesture and Spoken Command Recognition in Human-Robot Interaction

Monday, February 22, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
KEC 1003

Speaker Information

Petros Maragos
Professor
School of E.C.E.
National Technical University of Athens

Abstract

In this talk we will present some advances from our research in the EU project MOBOT which generally aims at the development of an intelligent active mobility assistance robot. We will focus on one of its main goals: to provide multimodal sensory processing capabilities for human action recognition. Specifically, a reliable multimodal information processing and action recognition system needs to be developed, that will detect, analyze and recognize the human user actions based on the captured multimodal sensory signals and with a reasonable level of accuracy and detail for intelligent assistive robotics. One of the main thrusts in the above effort is the development of robust and effective computer vision techniques to achieve the visual processing goals based on multiple cues such as spatiotemporal RGB appearance data as well as depth data from Kinect sensors. Another major challenge is the integration of recognizing specific verbal and gestural commands in the considered human-robot interaction context. In this presentation we summarize advancements in three tasks of the above multimodal processing system for human-robot interaction (HRI): action recognition, gesture recognition and spoken command recognition. Our multi-sensor spoken command recognition system has been developed in the framework of the EU project DIRHA. More information, related papers and current results can be found in http://cvsp.cs.ntua.gr and http://robotics.ntua.gr.

Speaker Bio

Petros Maragos received the Diploma in E.E. from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) in 1980 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, in 1982 and 1985. In 1985, he joined the faculty of the Division of Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he worked for eight years as professor of electrical engineering affiliated with the Harvard Robotics Lab. In 1993, he joined the faculty of the School of ECE at Georgia Tech. During periods of 1996-98 he had a joint appointment as director of research at the Institute of Language and Speech Processing in Athens. Since 1998, he has been working as a professor at the NTUA School of ECE. He has held a visiting scientist position at MIT LIDS in fall 2012. He is currently the Director of the NTUA Division of Signals, Control and Robotics, and the Director of the Intelligent Robotics and Automation Lab. His research and teaching interests include signal processing, systems theory, pattern recognition, image processing and computer vision, audio and speech/language processing, cognitive systems, and robotics. In the above areas he has published numerous papers, book chapters, and has also co-edited three Springer research books, one on multimodal processing and interaction and two on shape analysis. He has served as: Associate Editor for the IEEE Trans. on ASSP, IEEE Trans. on PAMI, and editorial board member and guest editor for several journals on signal processing, image analysis and vision; co-organizer of several conferences and workshops, including VCIP'92 (GC), ISMM'96 (GC), VLBV'01 (GC), MMSP'07 (GC), ECCV'10 (PC), ECCV’10 Workshop on Sign, Gesture and Activity, EUSIPCO'12 (TC), 2011 & 2014 Dagstuhl Symposia on Shape, 2015 IROS Workshop on Cognitive Mobility Assistance Robots; member of the IEEE committees on DSP, IMDSP and MMSP. He is currently organizing EUSIPCO 2017 (GC). His is the recipient or co-recipient of several awards for his academic work, including a 1983 Sigma Xi best thesis award, a 1987-1992 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, a 1988 IEEE SPS Young Author Best Paper Award, a 1994 IEEE SPS Senior Best Paper Award, the 1995 IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Award,the 1996 Pattern Recognition Society's Honorable Mention Award, the EURASIP 2007 Technical Achievement Award for contributions to nonlinear signal, image and speech processing, and the Best Paper Award of the IEEE CVPR-2011 Gesture Recognition Workshop. He was elected a Fellow of IEEE in 1995 and a Fellow of EURASIP in 2010 for his research contributions.

Magnetics + Mechanics + Nanoscale = Electromagnetics Future

Monday, February 29, 2016 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
KEC 1003

Speaker Information

Greg P. Carman
Professor
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department
UCLA

Abstract

Efficient control of small scale magnetism presents a significant problem for future miniature electromagnetic devices. In most macroscale electromagnetic systems we rely on a discovery made by Oersted 200 years ago where an electrical current through a wire creates a distributed magnetic field. While this concept works well at large scale, it suffers significant problems at volumes below 1 mm3. One approach to control nanoscale magnetic states is spin-transfer torque (STT). However, experimental measurements on STT memory devices indicates that 100 fJ is required to reorient a bit of memory with an energy barrier of about 0.5 aJ, i.e., at 0.0005 percent efficiency. Therefore, new nanoscale approaches are needed for future miniature electromagnetic devices. Recently, researchers have explored strain-mediated multiferroic composites to resolve this problem. For this material class, a voltage-induced strain alters the magnetic anisotropy of the magneto-elastic elements. These strain-mediated multiferroics consists of a piezoelectric material coupled to magneto-elastic elements to transfer electrical energy to magnetic energy through a mechanical transduction. The coupling coefficient (energy transferred) in piezoelectric materials (e.g., lead zirconate titanate, PZT) is approximately 0.8 while the coupling coefficient in magneto-elastic materials (e.g., Tb-Dy-Fe, Terfenol-D) is of similar magnitude, 0.8. Thus, the amount of energy to overcome a 0.5 aJ bit barrier is potentially only 0.8 aJ, or an efficiency of about 60 percent, neglecting line losses. This presentation reviews the motivation, history, and recent progress in nanoscale strain-mediated multiferroics. Research descriptions include analytical and experimental work on strain-mediated multiferroic thin films, single magnetic domain structures, and superparamagnetic particles. The results indicate efficiencies orders of magnitude superior to STT approaches and presents a new approach to control magnetism. Discussions of future research opportunities and novel applications are included.

Speaker Bio

Greg Carman received the Ph.D. degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1991. He joined the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1991. He is the director of a new National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center entitled Translational Applications of Nanoscale Multiferroic Materials (TANMS) and is engineering director of the Center for Advanced Surgical and Interventional Technology in the Department of Surgery at UCLA. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems Structures and for Smart Materials and Structures. He received the Northrop Grumman Young Faculty Award in 1995 and three best paper awards from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in 1996, 2001, and 2007. He was elected Fellow of the ASME in 2003 and was awarded the ASME Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Prize honoring his contributions to smart materials and structures in 2004. In 2015 SPIE honored him with the Smart Structures and Materials (SSM) Lifetime Achievement Award. Presently his research interests focus on analytical modeling, fabrication, and testing of multiferroic (magneto-electric) materials and developing devices for medical applications.

Past Colloquia

Radu Fetche
Monday, October 17, 2011 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
Dr. Aaron S. Crandall
Monday, October 10, 2011 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
Dr. James Buckwalter
Monday, October 3, 2011 -
4:00pm to 4:50pm
Kiri Wagstaff
Monday, September 26, 2011 (All day)
Anindya Patthak
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 (All day)
Sriraam Natarajan
Wednesday, August 31, 2011 -
4:00pm to 6:00pm

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