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Gaussian and EJ Networks - Some Efficient Interconnection Topologies for Parallel Systems

Monday, January 27, 2014 - 4:00pm
KEC 1001

Speaker Information

Bella Bose
Professor and Associate Director
School of EECS
Oregon State University


<p>Interconnection topology plays a major role in achieving high performance in parallel systems. In the past, many interconnection topologies have been proposed - some most popular being <span data-scayt_word="hypercube" data-scaytid="1">hypercube</span>, <span data-scayt_word="torus" data-scaytid="2">torus</span>, mesh, De <span data-scayt_word="Bruijn" data-scaytid="3">Bruijn</span> networks, etc. Recently, some efficient interconnection topologies called Gaussian networks and <span data-scayt_word="Eisenstein-Jacobi" data-scaytid="4">Eisenstein-Jacobi</span> networks have been introduced. The topologies of these networks are based on the concepts of Gaussian and <span data-scayt_word="EJ" data-scaytid="5">EJ</span> integers. In this talk, first a brief overview of these number theory concepts including how to obtain modulo of a given Gaussian or <span data-scayt_word="EJ" data-scaytid="6">EJ</span> number is given. Then, the interconnection topology, the topological properties, <span data-scayt_word="Hamiltonian" data-scaytid="7">Hamiltonian</span> decomposition of these networks, routing and broadcasting algorithms, resource placement algorithms, etc. are presented.</p>

Speaker Bio

Bella Bose has been at Oregon State University since 1980 and has been the Associate Director for the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science since 2003. He works in the areas of error correcting codes, parallel processing and computer networks and has published close to 200 refereed journal and conference papers in these areas. His work has been continuously supported by National Science Foundation for 30 years. He has been a visiting faculty member at Stanford University for two years, Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Rome, University of Bergen, Kuwait University and King Saud University. He is a Fellow of both Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) and Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).