Monday, October 15, 2018 - 4:00pm to 4:50pm
LINC 200

Speaker Information

Sanjit K. Mitra
University of California, Santa Barbara, California
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Abstract

Polyphase decomposition of a sequence was advanced to develop computationally efficient interpolators and decimators, and has also been used to design computationally efficient quadrature-mirror filter banks.  The polyphase decomposition represents a sequence into a set of sub-sequences, called polyphase components.  However, the polyphase components do not exhibit any spectral separation.  In this talk, we first review the concept of structural subband decomposition, a generalization of the polyphase decomposition, which decomposes a sequence into a set of sub-sequences with some spectral separation that can be exploited advantageously in many digital signal processing applications. We then outline some of the applications of the structural subband decomposition, such as, efficient design and implementation of FIR digital filters, development of computationally efficient decimators and interpolators, subband adaptive filtering, and fast computation of discrete transforms.

* This talk is part of the Gaulke Distinguished Lecture Series *

Speaker Bio

Sanjit K. Mitra is a Research Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara and Professor Emeritus, Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

Dr. Mitra has served IEEE in various capacities including service as the President of the IEEE Circuits & Systems Society in 1986. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, a member of the Norwegian Academy of Technological Sciences, an Academician of the Academy of Finland, a foreign member of the Finnish Academy of Sciences and Arts, a foreign member of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Croatian Academy of Engineering, and the Academy of Engineering, Mexico, and a Foreign Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences, India and the Indian National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Mitra is a Life Fellow of the IEEE.