Current Projects

CURRENT PROJECTS (version 9 October 2001):

NSF FRG: P-type Transparent Conductive Oxides: Synthesis and Applications
(https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/servlet/showaward?award=0071727)

Start Date:
Expires:
Expected Total Amt.:
Investigator:

May 15, 2000
May 14, 2003
$750000 (Estimated)
Janet Tate (Principal Investigator current)
John F. Wager (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Arthur W. Sleight (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Douglas A. Keszler (Co-Principal Investigator current)

Abstract:

This is a Focused Research Group project aimed at the synthesis and possible novel applications of new p-type transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) with superior properties. The three primary thrusts of the proposed program are: Selection and evaluation of new p-type TCOs exhibiting superior performance; Thin-film synthesis of new p-type TCOs; Demonstration of new p-type TCOs in novel applications. The exploratory synthesis of bulk p-type oxides will be guided by mobility trends. The properties of the bulk form will be evaluated, and substitutional doping and oxygen intercalation will be explored. The most promising materials will be identified and transferred to thin-film research. Thin films will be synthesized by a variety of physical vapor deposition methods including sputtering, activated thermal co-evaporation and electron-beam evaporation. The films will be extensively characterized in an effort to understand the optimization of conductivity and transparency. The availability of both n-and p-type transparent devices suggests novel opto-electronic devices are possible. Simple devices will be demonstrated using the best materials generated from the thin-film studies.

NSF GOALI/FRG: Full-Color Phosphors for Electroluminescent Displays
(https://www.fastlane.nsf.gov/servlet/showaward?award=0071899)

Start Date:
Expires:
Expected Total Amt.:
Investigator:
August 1, 2000
July 31, 2003 (Estimated)
$582435 (Estimated)
John F. Wager (Principal Investigator current)
Janet Tate (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Sey-Shing Sun (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Richard Tuenge (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Douglas A. Keszler (Co-Principal Investigator current)

Abstract:

This GOALI project is a collaborative effort between researchers at Oregon State University and Planar Systems, Inc., Beaverton, OR. Primary goals are to increase basic understanding of luminescent materials, and to exploit their properties to achieve bright, efficient, and manufacturable red, green, and blue (RGB) phosphors for use in flat-panel displays. The approach involves three basic routes: (i) Luminescent impurity and defect engineering of conventional sulfide phosphors, ZnS, SrS, and CaS., (ii) Exploratory development of novel, low-temperature sulfide, selenide, and telluride phosphors-BaS and MX (M=Mg, Ca, Sr; X=Se, Te.), (iii) Optimization of oxide phosphors. A variety of conventional and unconventional luminescent impurities will be investigated. Defect engineering will involve compensation, color shifting, and/or vacancy scavenging considerations. The viability of oxides, e.g., Zn2GeO4:Mn and Zn2SixGe1-xO4:Mn, as phosphors will be assessed by identifying the physical mechanisms that limit device performance and then developing performance-improvement strategies. Phosphor studies will be conducted using a rapid-throughput process. New phosphor, luminescent impurity, co-activator materials systems will be synthesized as powders, and their performance assessed and optimized through photoluminescence characterization. In this manner, luminescent impurity incorporation, defect engineering, and alloying studies will be integrated with thin film processing and characterization which will be carried out with promising powder phosphors. Thin-film evaporation source material and sputter targets will be synthesized using solid-state synthesis/processing methods. Two techniques will be investigated to incorporate luminescent impurities and co-activators into phosphor thin films, conventional in situ doping during thin-film deposition and 'flux doping.' Finally, alternating current thin film EL (ACTFEL) devices will be fabricated and tested to appraise the viability of a given phosphor system for applications. This research procedure involving powder synthesis, processing and characterization, followed by luminescence assessment, thin film 'flux doping', and ACTFEL performance represents a general methodology-additional basic materials studies to identify and gain understanding of fundamental mechanisms will be carried out as well.

ARO/MURI: Intelligent Luminescence for Communication, Display and Identification

Start Date:
Expires:
Expected Total Amt.:
Investigator:
June 2001
May 2006
$1,200,000 (Estimated)
John F. Wager (Principal Investigator)
Douglas A. Keszler (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Janet Tate (Co-Principal Investigator current)
Mike Lerner (Co-Principal Investigator current)

Abstract:

This multi-university research initiative (MURI) project involving researchers from U. Florida, Georgia Tech. Oregon State U., Penn State U., and U. Pennsylvania is a highly integrated, cross-disciplinary research program whose goal it to establish the scientific and technological basis for intelligent luminescent materials, devices, and systems. Intelligent luminescence is interpreted as a defining paradigm for acquiring, processing, and displaying information in a brain-like manner. Thus an intelligent luminescent material, device, or system will adjust either by changing itself, by responding to its environment, or by seeking a new environment. Intelligence will be mimicked by designing and engaging new composite material/device structures that enable a system to react to external stimuli and to respond accordingly. Prototypical intelligent systems will be demonstrated to emphasize these developments. OSU research activity involves the development and utilization of transparent electronic / optoelectronic and electron trapping materials in the realization of intelligent luminescent materials, devices, and systems.

School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Corvallis, OR 97331-5501
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