OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Miguel Delgado

A better future

December 7, 2012

Miguel Delgado

Education and opportunities are what Miguel Delgado’s parents did not have for themselves, but knew they wanted for their two young sons.

“We were living in very poor conditions in Mexico, and my parents’ decision to emigrate to the U.S. gave us a better future,” Delgado says.

When he was barely a toddler and his brother a baby, the family moved from Guadalajara, Jalisco to Medford, Ore., where his dad found work as an agriculturist and his mom provided financial support through seasonal work. But finances were always a struggle when he was growing up.

Then it was discovered a few years ago that his younger brother, who has mild cerebral palsy, needed a kidney transplant.

“It was a life changing event for the whole family. The medical bills were super expensive and even though we received help from several organizations, there was still a lot for us to pay,” he says.

At this critical time, Delgado received additional support from the Hal and Bev Brown Scholarship Endowment Fund which has assisted him in continuing his studies at Oregon State University in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

“When I was young I found my passion for creating things through Legos. Later, I developed a keen interest in electrical devices and rapidly changing technologies,” Delgado says. “That’s what led me eventually to engineering.”

Focused on employability, Delgado plans to do internships every summer, already completing his first at NetApp after his freshman year. Although his studies keep him busy he also enjoys traveling to new places, working out, drawing, and playing piano. But he keeps his eye on the bigger goal beyond graduation — eventually supporting his parents so they can retire.

“Getting an education was really important to my parents, especially in a field that's tough like engineering. It’s something they always wanted for me and they're excited to see it come true,” Delgado says.


— By Rachel Robertson